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Rotary’s Top Female Leader Says Recruiting Women Is A Growth Opportunity - #1192
Clean
December 04, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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On World Polio Day, I had the opportunity to sit down with Jennifer Jones who now serves on The Rotary Foundation Board of Trustees and who previously served on the Rotary International Board of Directors and as its Vice President. In that capacity, she reached the highest rank achieved by a female in Rotary.

Rotary excluded women until a United States Supreme Court ruling on May 5, 1987 that opened the door for women to join the organization.

Jennifer was a reporter who covered Rotary before women were allowed to join and remembers attending at least one club meeting with all men. She was treated well and later, when the opportunity presented itself, she joined.

She has risen through the ranks in an unprecedented way. Speculation abounds that she could one day be Rotary’s first female president.

In our discussion, we talked about her experiences and thoughts about women in Rotary. She points out that because women slightly outnumber men in the world and are also underrepresented in Rotary, an emphasis on recruiting women represents an opportunity to grow Rotary’s membership.

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My Nominee For The Title Of ‘The Most Interesting Man In The World’ - #1191
Clean
December 02, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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Warner Woodworth, now 78, is an emeritus professor at the Marriott School of Business at Brigham Young University. Describing him that way is sort of like saying that Bill Gates used to work at Microsoft. While true, it fails completely to capture the essence of the person.

Warner has had a hand in launching 40 NGOs, has worked with social innovators around the world, including Nobel Peace Prize winner Mohammad Yunus.

His politics are distinctly liberal. At BYU, a famously consevative and pious school owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he has been advocating for worker ownership for two generations. While worker ownership isn’t incongruous with capitalism it is a hallmark of socialism. He says he advocates for “humanistic capitalism.”

He admits his work isn’t always appreciated. “I get my share of criticism from my colleagues and my students and letters from their parents and letters from their church leaders, sometimes to church officials in Salt Lake or the administration, but bless their hearts, the big boys [at Church headquarters] have always said, ‘Warner, you do something unique, something we value greatly. You're reaching lots of people, none of us can. And you're not just talking. You're making change in the world.’ So it's worked out to be a pretty positive experience.”

Warner loves the Church but isn’t shy about his politics. For instance, he visited one of the migrant caravans from Central America as it arrived in Northern Mexico, advocating for better treatment for them.

As we visited, Warner shared his experience living in Brazil for two years at age 19. “I saw the oppression. I saw the poverty. I came back saying, ‘I know my mission in life. I know my purpose, it's to help people like them and to learn from them and collaborate and build partnerships.’”

And that is what he’s done for 50 years.

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Rotary President Mark Maloney Dismisses Suggestions Of Personal Greatness - #1190
Clean
November 29, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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Visiting with Rotary International President Mark Maloney is a bit like visiting with an old friend. He is absolutely without pretense despite being the elected leader of 1.2 million Rotarians around the world.

Having contributed 34 years to the fight to eradicate polio, he emphasizes his role as one of the million rather than allowing he might be one in a million.

While acknowledging that 2019’s polio case count is up from 2017 and 2018, he is confidently optimistic that Rotary—with help from its partners in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative—will complete the task soon.

Interview with Mark Daniel Maloney, the President of Rotary International.

The following is the pre-interview with Mark Daniel Maloney. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is your personal or professional connection to polio?

Rotary's long-term, sustained battle against polio has defined our organization for decades.

Where are you presently focused?

In 1988, polio was endemic in 125 countries, with more than 350,000 new cases a year worldwide. Since then, Rotary and our Global Polio Eradication Initiative partners have reduced the incidence of polio by more than 99.9 percent, and vaccinated more than 2.5 billion children against the virus.

Now only Afghanistan and Pakistan continue to report cases of the wild virus, and eradication is within grasp, but we still have work to do.

We will end polio forever, but only if we remain steadfast and vigilant. World Polio Day is a time for Rotary and supporters from all over the globe to come together, recognize the progress we have made in our fight against polio, and plan the action we must take to end polio forever.

How do we get from where we are to total polio eradication?

Looking at all we’ve accomplished so far, I’m optimistic that the end of polio is within our grasp, but we must remain steadfast and vigilant as we address the remaining challenges to eradication.

When we reach our goal, polio will become only the second human disease eradicated on the planet, and children will never again have to face this terrible, disabling virus. Rotary must continue to connect the world in the effort toward polio eradication. It is up to us. Let us finish the job.

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Rotary’s PolioPlus Chair Commits To Finishing What It Started In 1988 - #1189
Clean
November 27, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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In 1985, Rotary International made the decision to tackle polio eradication. In 1988, it officially launched the effort, hoping to complete eradication by 2004 when the global service organization celebrated its centennial celebration. Now 15 years late, Michael McGovern, the volunteer chair of Rotary’s International PolioPlus Committee says he and Rotary are committed to finishing what they started.

Early in his Rotary career, which spans more than three decades, one of the members asked him out for drinks and asked him to make a pledge to fight polio. “That was an expensive drink,” he says of his commitment. He’s still following up on that today.

Interview with Michael K. McGovern, the Chair of Rotary's International PolioPlus Committee of Rotary International.

The following is the pre-interview with Michael K. McGovern. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is your personal or professional connection to polio?

Chair of Rotary's International PolioPlus Committee since 2014

Where are you presently focused?

We have the wild poliovirus cornered in the smallest geographic area in history, and Rotary is doubling down on our commitment to end polio for good.

How do we get from where we are to total polio eradication?

We must remain vigilant in rallying global political and financial support as we push towards a polio-free world.

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JB Dondolo Garners J&J Matching Funds Using CaringCrowd - #1188
Clean
November 25, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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B Dondolo, a nonprofit named for the father of the founder, Lumbie Mlambo. The organization is working to improve health outcomes at the Igusi Clinic. One of the projects completed was to provide a water filtration system.

Prior to completion of the system, the clinic lacked clean water--imagine trying to operate a medical facility without a source of clean water.

Lumbie, working with development director Ronda Bowen, raised almost $10,000 on CaringCrowd. Almost half of that amount came from a match from Johnson & Johnson.

Preliminary Interview with Lumbie Mlambo, the Founder / CEO
of JB Dondolo, Inc.

The following is a brief pre-interview that provides context for the recorded interview you may watch or listen to at the top of this article.

Lumbie Mlambo is the CEO and Founder of JB Dondolo, Inc.

What is the purpose of your crowdfunding campaign?

To replace old, rusty and busted water pipes with new ones at the Igusi Clinic.

What has been your experience using CaringCrowd?

We've been very fortunate to have all donations matched by Johnson & Johnson. From the funds we raised, we were able to have the sand and water samples collected and tested in the lab by the National University of Science and Technology (NUST). With the lab results, NUST was able to suggest a filtration system appropriate for the area. We purchased the system and installed it. Then we retested the water with NUST and the water was found to be clean and safe for consumption.

We've also used the funds to renovate Igusi Clinic. We replaced the doors, windows, roof, repaired cracks, painted the entire clinic, mothers-in-waiting cottage, kitchen, and nurse cottages. Also, we fenced the clinic, installed signage and gated it.

We are currently installing a shed around the filtration system to keep animals and people safe.
Matching funds. It made it a lot easier to raise say $5k (example) because we only had to raise half of that. Therefore, we were able to raise funds fast.

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Here’s How You Can Likely Offset Your Carbon Footprint For Just $20 Per Month - #1187
Clean
November 22, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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You can probably offset your entire carbon footprint for just $20 per month per person in your household. The process is easy, and you can simply set up a monthly plan and forget about it, so it takes no time. Here’s one way to do it; I’m sure there are others.
Cool Effect is a nonprofit that operates a crowdfunding site at CoolEffect.org for buying carbon offsets. Every project on the site not only offsets carbon but also does additional good.
Cool Effect CEO Marisa De Belloy joined me for a conversation about carbon offsets you can watch in the player at the top of this article.
She describes climate change as the “issue of our time.”
The first step in offsetting your carbon is to determine your impact. The average American emits 16.6 metric tons of carbon per year. If you want to get into the weeds, you can use this calculator or any of the variety of calculators available online. It may be easier to simply guestimate how your footprint compares by weighing things like the size of your home, the car(s) you drive, whether you have solar panels on the roof, etc.

Read the full Forbes article and watch the interview here: http://bit.ly/2XCrWxf.

Formerly Incarcerated Entrepreneur Helps Those Facing Time To Live Their Best Lives - #1186
Clean
November 20, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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My cousin, who is currently in prison, shared with me how much Michael Santos’ work was changing his life so I had to invite him on the show. Michael helps people prepare for and have the best experience possible in prison to help them be successful leaving it.

“My name is Michael. I mean, I'm a guy who made a lot of bad decisions as a young man. I was 20 years old when I thought it would be kind of fun to traffic in cocaine,” Michael begins. “And it turned out to be a really bad decision.”

“By the time I was 23, I was arrested by federal authorities and locked in prison and facing a sentence of life without the possibility of parole. I made some bad decisions even at the earliest stages after my arrest. I should have been accepting responsibility and working toward reconciling with society for the bad decisions that I had made. Instead, I pleaded not guilty. I went to trial. I perjured myself on the stand,” he continues.

“And it was while during that awkward stage between sentencing, between conviction and sentencing that I just had this change of mindset. I was exposed to the work of Socrates and that work completely changed my life and influenced the way I served nine thousand five hundred days in prison”

Michael has since gone on to become successful, helping prisoners--and those facing prison--to make the most of their lives.

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German To Take Helm Of Rotary International On July 1, 2020 - #1183
Clean
November 18, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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Rotary International is headquartered in the United States and a plurality of recent presidents are from the U.S., but Rotary lives up to its monicker with a majority of its Presidents coming from outside the U.S. Rotary’s current president-elect is Holger Knaack from Hamburg, Germany.

Fit and vigorous, Holger sports reading glasses positioned low on his nose, giving him the appearance of a skinny Santa Claus. The likeness doesn’t end there. Genuinely jovial, he seemed to delight in our conversation.

Rotary is an international organization with leaders coming from around the world, operating in a representative manner. Holger shared with me some of the differences he sees between Rotary in Central Europe, including Austria, Switzerland and Germany on the one hand and the U.S. on the other. Differences are remarkable.

One key difference is that it remains such an honor to be invited to join a Rotary Club in Germany that he jokes, we only leave Rotary “feet first.” Retention and recruitment are not a problem. He noted, however, that their American counterparts remain more generous with the Rotary Foundation.

Watch the full interview for more insights.

Interview with Holger Knaack, the President-elect of Rotary International.

The following is the pre-interview with Holger Knaack. Be sure to watch the recorded interview above.

What is your personal or professional connection to polio?

For more than 30 years, Rotary has been the driving force in the worldwide polio eradication effort.

Where are you presently focused?

Rotary must continue to connect the world in the effort toward polio eradication. World Polio Day is a time for Rotary and its partners and supporters from all over the globe to come together, recognize the progress we have made in our fight against polio, and plan the action we must take to end polio forever.

How do we get from where we are to total polio eradication?
It’s imperative that we continue to raise awareness about the importance of polio eradication. Rotary embarked on this journey in 1985, and we won’t back down until every last child is protected from polio.

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Malaria Expert Challenges The World To Eradicate The Disease - #1184
Clean
November 15, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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Dr. Winnie Mpanju-Shumbusho, a former leader on malaria eradication with the World Health Organization and co-author of a recent report published in The Lancet, says we are making progress on malaria eradication as a result of four key interventions being scaled up in endemic countries:

Bed nets and other efforts to protect people from mosquito bites
Rapid diagnosis leads to earlier treatment and fewer deaths
More effective treatments have been developed and implemented
Environmental controls to reduce mosquito breeding places

Reaching full eradication will require not only continuing to scale these interventions but also adding additional innovation, including the need for an effective vaccination.

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This Amazing Innovation In Housing Construction Could Make It More Affordable - #1183
Clean
November 13, 2019 06:00 AM PST
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Boxabl, led by CEO Paolo Tiramani, has created an innovation for housing construction that could stand up a home ready to move in in a matter of hours rather than months!

The process begins with factory-built units that can be assembled almost like Legos on-site to create buildings up to four stories.

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